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MTG on Budget

Pioneer on Budget - Mono-Red Aggro

Let's take a look at a strong archetype, present in several formats: Mono-Red Aggro.

Hello, players! Welcome to our *Magic on Budget* series, where we take strong decks in the metagame and make them more accessible, but still good! Changing gears a bit, let's take a break from Standard and move on to a format that is on the rise, Pioneer. This time we're delving into a strong archetype: the *Mono-Red Aggro.* [deck](19535) *This deck has several low-cost creatures so we can assault our opponents from the get-go:* Starting off, we will keep all 4 copies of [card](Bomat Courier), a 1/1 artifact creature with haste costing just 1 generic mana that will exile the top card of our library whenever it attacks (face down - we can't see which card is it). But at any moment we can pay 1 red mana to sacrifice him along with our current hand so we can put all cards exiled with [card](Bomat Courier) on its owner's hands - in this case, ours. We'll also keep all 4 copies of [card](Ghitu Lavarunner), a 1/2 creature that has +1/+0 and haste as long as there are two or more instant and/or sorcery cards in our graveyard. Furthermore, we will also maintain all 4 copies of [card](Monastery Swiftspear), a 1/2 creature with haste that have prowess - meaning that it gains +1/+1 until end of turn whenever we cast a noncreature spell. Once more, we will keep all 4 copies of [card](Soul-Scar Mage) another creature with prowess (see above). On top of that, if a source we control deal noncombat damage to a creature an opponent controls, the damage will be dealt as a -1/-1 counters. With this, we can deal with indestructible creatures or weaken larger ones. We'll only keep a single copy of [card](Hazoret the Fervent), a 5/4 legendary creature with indestructible and haste that can't attack or block unless we have one or fewer cards in our hand. At the cost of 1 red and 2 generic mana we discard a card to deal 2 damage to each opponent. Although we have [card](Eidolon of the Great Revel) on the list (which is a great card), for our budget version we exchanged its 4 copies for 4 [card](Ash Zealot), a 2/2 creature with first strike and haste. Beyond that, whenever a player casts a spell from a graveyard, [card](Ash Zealot) deals 3 damage to that player. It can help doing more damage against some strategies. *In addition to our creatures, we have burns that serve both as removals and quick finishers, depending on the match:* We will keep 4 copies of [card](Wild Slash), an instant which for only 1 red mana will deal 2 damage to target creature or player. If we have a creature with power 4 or greater when we play this card, damage can't be prevented this turn. [card](Lightning Strike) is an instant with 1 red and 1 generic mana cost that deals 3 damage to any target, simple as that. We'll keep 4 copies of it. We'll also keep 4 copies of [card](Wizard's Lightning), an instant costing 1 red and 2 generic mana that will deal 3 damage to any target. If we control a Wizard, we can cast it for only 1 red mana. *To catch our breath we have:* 4 copies of [card](Light Up the Stage), a sorcery costing 2 generic and 1 red mana that will exile the top two cards of our library, allowing us to play them until the end of our next turn. It also has a spectacle cost, that is, if any opponent lost life this turn, we can cast it for only 1 red mana. Closing out or spells, [card](Smuggler's Copter) is a great card, but for budget reasons, we will exchange all 4 copies for 4 [card](The Flame of Keld), an enchantment Saga that, when entering the battlefield, will make us discard our hand (which will usually be empty or low on cards anyway). In the next draw step, we will draw 2 additional cards. Finally, on the following draw step, If a red source we control would deal damage to a permanent or player this turn, it deals that much damage plus 2. So, this card help us on our draws and finishing the match. *Closing out our list, we have the following mana base:* 1 copy of [card](Castle Embereth), a land that enters the battlefield tapped unless we control a Mountain. It can be tapped to generate 1 red mana or tapped at the cost of 2 red and 1 generic one to grant +1/+0 to our creatures until end of turn. We will keep 4 copies of [card](Ramunap Ruins), which can be tapped to add a colorless mana, tapped at the cost of 1 life to add 1 red mana or tapped at the cost of 2 red and 2 generic mana to sacrifice a Desert, dealing 2 damage to each opponent. To complete the list we have 14 [card](Mountain) cards. *Without much changing we arrive at the following list:* [deck](19536) In short, this deck can be quite explosive in the early game with low-cost creatures, getting even stronger thanks to [card](Castle Embereth) and prowess. On top of that, [card](The Flame of Keld) can be used to end the game with the extra damage it brings. I hope you enjoyed this deck and see you soon!

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Ari Ferreira

Top 5 green creatures in Pauper


Hey guys, this is Ari and today we will start a new series here at Cards Realm. To start TOP 5, I will list the best green creatures in pauper. But before I have a very quick message. For those who aren't yet familiar with [link](https://www.manadelver.wordpress.com)(projeto Mana Delver), we have a biweekly podcast where I invite community members to talk about various topics from Magic. Our podcast is available for Android and iOS apps and you can also find us on Deezer and Spotify. Be sure to check out our podcast. Now let's get down to business, because this top 5 promises to be so good that we had to make room for an honorable mention... Although it's not among the top 5 green creatures in Pauper, this card plays a lot on Standard Tron Deck. Its cost isn't so high for Tron, and besides having a respectful body, this creature gains a lot of life, often 10 life points will be more than enough to end all opponent's chances of winning the game, so [card](Fangren Marauder) deserves to be cited in this article as our honorable mention. [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/mbs-mirrodin-besieged-fangren-marauder-79.jpg) *Fifth place* This creature plays a lot on artifact-based decks, especially the well-known Affinity Pauper. [card](Carapace Forger) 's Metal Mastery ability makes, most of the times, possible to cast a 4/4 creature in the second round. Do you have any idea how aggressive this is? Not all removals deal with this creature, if it is not removed by the opponent it is likely to be the strongest creature on the table the next turn, attacking for four damage on the opponent or forcing him to make an unfavorable block. The [card](Carapace Forger) just isn't better positioned in this Top 5 just because it plays on specific artifact decks... [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/som-scars-of-mirrodin-carapace-forger-114.jpg) *Fourth place* This creature can be used on many decks, one of them is the aristocratic BG that abuses sacrifice mechanics, where it is sacrificed to increase the power of other creatures. In addition, it is of utmost importance to the sideboard of combo decks that suffer greatly from sacrifice, protecting the main deck creatures by sacrificing the [card](Young Wolf) that returns with Undying. Its higher quality is to have the opponent spend 2 removals on a single creature, thereby reducing the advantage that the deck control has over creature-based decks, while preserving the gas of its main deck, Stompy. And when he is enchanted with Rancor, he becomes one of his opponent's biggest challenges. Another match where [card](Young Wolf) shines is against Infect. Although the infect is not a competitive deck, Young Wolf disrupts the deck because infecting creatures deal damage in the form of -1 / -1 counters causing Young Wolf to always return to the battlefield with a counter + 1 / + 1, giving the best possible use for your Immortal ability. [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/dka-dark-ascension-young-wolf-134.jpg) *Third place* Very important for aggressive decks because of its low cost and good body. [card](Nettle Sentinel) costs 1 green mana, is a 2/2 warrior elf that doesn't untap in its untap phase, but can be untapped whenever you cast a green spell. Let's take a closer look at its second ability as it is very important for [card](Nettle Sentinel) to be Pauper's third best green creature. This ability decreases or practically nullifies the cards drawback, as it is not at all difficult for you to cast something to untap it and make it fit for attack. Remember that the magic doesn't even have to be resolved, just casted. It is common for you to attack with Nettle Sentinel and untap it on the same turn to have one more blocker. In addition to the speed and aggressiveness already mentioned, this same ability makes Nettle Sentinel important for the formats mini combos as well. We can name a few classic interactions such as generating multiple manas with Birchlore Rangers on the field and equipping the sentry with Viridian Longbow to deal damage several times. [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/a25-masters-25-nettle-sentinel-182.jpg) *Second place* Hexproof is a skill that doesn't allow the creature to be targeted by its opponents' spells or abilities. In other words, this skill is essential for a deck like GW Auras for example. [card](Silhana Ledgewalker) is essential in this deck for two reasons, the first one we already mentioned: hexproof. The second reason is its evasion, as well as not being easily removed, the opponent will also have difficulty blocking it, as Silhana can only be blocked by flying creatures. Besides that, to justify Silhana's second place in our top 5, she has recently become very important in the Mono G Stompy strategy that has been using four copies of Elephant Guide in addition to the Rancors, meaning that Silhana Megazord provides greater chances of victory in tricky matches for Stompy's traditional aggressive strategy. [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/gpt-guildpact-silhana-ledgewalker-94.jpg) *First place* And finally it's time to reveal the first place in our top 5. [card](Quirion Ranger) costs 1 green mana, and is a 1/1 elf who has the following ability: "Return a forest you control to its owner's hand: Untap target creature. Use this ability only once for each turn " Why is this ability so good? I'm going to explain. Quirion usually plays on fast decks, meaning they have few land and low mana creatures. On this type of deck, Qurion allows you to decrease the number of lands and increase the number of creatures or spells without risking being out of lands. This type of deck can benefit very well from the drawback of the card. It is common for you to generate a mana, return a forest to your hand, and play it again for additional mana. To give you an idea of ​​how positive this drawback is for the deck, sometimes the target of Quirion's ability ends up being a creature that is already untapped, just so that this additional mana can be generated. But untapping a creature is a very powerful ability that allows the most diverse interactions: In Elves, for example, there are several creatures that activate an ability when tapped. Quirion allows these abilities to be used more than once. In Stompy, in addition to speeding up your game, Quirion allows you to attack with a creature and untap it to have a blocker available. [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/vis-visions-quirion-ranger-117.jpg) What now? We have reached the end of the article and you probably have something to comment on it right? How about leaving your Top 5 in the comment session? I hope you enjoyed the article and see you next time o/.

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Ari Ferreira

Analista de Sistemas em São Paulo. Jogador e produtor de conteúdo sobre MTG. Criador e apresentador do Canal e Podcast Mana Delver. Apesar de ser apaixonado pelo Pauper, também joga e aprecia todos os outros formatos.

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Thiago Fogaça

The Commander with Food Chain - The First Sliver


Hello, my dears! How are you? My name is Fogaça and I'm here again to talk about Commander. When we did our analysis on Eldraine, I talked about [card](Chulane, Teller of Tales), and its possibilities; [link](https://cardsrealm.com/articles/o-commander-com-eldraine-01---chulane-teller-of-tales)(in that same article), I mentioned that our druid could fit into a [card](Food Chain) strategy, but I didn't go into details about this particular archetype. Today, therefore, we will have the long-awaited Food Chain dissertation, and, for that, we will speak of its most oppressive commander: [card](The First Sliver). [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/mh1-modern-horizons-the-first-sliver-200.jpg) *INITIAL CONCEPTIONS* I know I may be letting a good point pass, but in this analysis we will comment only on [card](Food Chain) classic, leaving [card](Chulane, Teller of Tales) for another time. The combo we're talking about here involves exiling [card](Misthollow Griffin), [card](Eternal Scourge) or [card](Squee, the Immortal), with the enchantment used, to conjure them again from exile and enable infinite mana - the general chosen will serve to be conjured and exiled to successively benefit from its cascade effect. We can look back at how this sliver became oppressive and why its fellow archetypes fell out of favor. We will start by quoting [card](General Tazri), a five-color commander with the ability to search for an ally when entering the field - his effect was sufficient when there was only him as an option (tutoring only allies reduced options from wincons to cards like [card](Kalastria Healer) or similar, being somewhat restrictive). With the advent of War of the Spark, we had a solution to Tazri's restriction problem: [card](Niv-Mizzet Reborn) now gave us the option to fetch multicolored cards instead of allies, which increased the commander's possibilities as a resource in itself, but it still made the construction somewhat restrictive, as we should place many two-color cards to fill in the gaps left by monocolored staples. By launching the Modern Horizons collection, Wizards solved the problems of [card](Food Chain) players by creating a commander that enabled almost unrestrictive construction while being a recursion piece by itself. [image](https://cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/mmq-mercadian-masques-food-chain-246.jpg) *DECK CONSTRUCTION* Now that we know the potential of the chosen fractius, as well as the combo used, we must wonder how successive field entries can add up to the ability to cast any spell of cost 4 or less without paying its mana cost. The solution of this equation is based on the use of effects such as [card](Corpse Knight), [card](Purphoros, God of the Forge), [card](Goblin Bombardment) and [card](Impact Tremors), adding value with infinite ETB effects from our cascade machine. If we know how to finish the game, we will need to know how to get the necessary pieces to do so. This archetype is peculiar from the point where we can exile pieces from our combo without remorse, which can be cast from exile - this also gives us the advantage of using effects that exile cards from our library as tutors; [card](Manipulate Fate) becomes a tutor and filter to remove and to give access to creatures that will be combined with [card](Food Chain) as well as forbidden tutors ([card](Demonic Consultation) and [card](Tainted Pact)) become 2 to 1 effects when you remove the mana pieces and grant us access to the coveted enchantment. In addition to the good use of the mentioned tutors, added to the potential of [card](The First Sliver) ability, is the ability to use [card](Jace, Mystery Manipulator) as a kill condition without the slightest shame. [deck](10738) Everything else is based on individual value cards that can add both speed and consistency to our combo, which turns out to be one of the format's most resilient combos. *CONCLUSION* Thus, after analyzing the arguments, it can be concluded that decks evolve over time. Even though there is a somewhat restricting commander today, we can put faith in the support that WotC gives us; Commander is one of the main products for Magic - the game company looks kindly at us format players and gradually allows the meta defects to be fixed. This is all for today. Thanks to everyone who has been following this series of articles and I ask you always to leave your feedback so we can keep improving. [link](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyqfJp8MNsmyE89F2ALRYrg)(To follow us on YouTube, visit my channels link). Until next time, my dears!

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Thiago Fogaça

Jogador de Magic desde Tarkir, sou apaixonado por interações e sinergias que quebram a curva do jogo. Para mim, o cEDH é o teste máximo para o jogador de Magic, tanto para deck build, quanto para gameplay. Para me acompanhar no YouTube, acessem meu canal.

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